DuroMax XP10000E Generator Review Reveals Problems

Since I was shopping for a generator, it only made sense to go online and see what people were buying. How these people felt about their generator purchase would certainly influence my buying decision. What I found were mostly weak reviews that lacked substance, except for one. This generator review was indeed a rare find in an ocean of misinformation. Not only did the author take the time to write about the good points of his XP10000E generator, but he also took the time to expand on the problem areas. What he identified as a problem (battery charging abilities), could be a big concern for many.

Women, who are living alone, often prefer the convenience of a portable generator that can be started with the turn of a key. Most women don’t like pulling on a cord to start a lawn mower, let alone a 16HP generator engine. Because of this, it’s probably a good idea for women to avoid buying a DuroMax XP10000E generator. If the power goes out, and the generator is difficult to start, what good is it?

Men, on the other hand, don’t seem to have as many problems starting gasoline powered engines with pull cords. According to the author that reviewed the XP10000E, he can start the 10,000 watt generator in a few pulls. I’m sure the oil viscosity plays a major role in how easy the generator’s engine starts, but he apparently uses 10W-30 synthetic oil for all season use.

The review I read did point out that the XP10000E generator is heavy. At 250 pounds, even a strong man will have a hard time transporting the generator or moving it great distances. While the wheel kit helps to improve the unit’s mobility, it still will not be easy to move over difficult terrain. A wet lawn, for example, may cause the generator’s tires to sink into the soil. However, this problem is not unique to just the XP10000E. All high-wattage generators are heavy.

If there is one thing that upsets me with a large purchase is the lack of information in an owner’s manual. The guy that reviewed the XP10000E portable generator noted that DuroMax did not even identify how much oil should be used in the engine. I think this is a critical piece of information that should be present in the owner’s manual!

Most of the really expensive generators I’ve seen do have a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) built right in the unit. Apparently the XP10000E does not have this safety feature, but the person that reviewed the generator stipulated that in-line GFCI devices can be used. This adds to the cost of safely running a generator, and could be a concern to those that are supplying electricity to devices near water.

To provide electricity to appliances and other electrical devices, the XP10000E does have many receptacles. Whether it’s a standard 120 volt connection or a specialized 240 volt generator cord, the XP10000E allows plenty of hookup options. In fact, the NEMA 14-50R 50 AMP receptacle is useful if the generator will be used to provide “whole home” electricity. However, national electric safety codes do require the use of a transfer switch that isolates the electricity produced by the generator from utility lines. Improper wiring can be unsafe to electric company workers and even start a fire! When buying a generator, we must weigh the good with the bad. Although generators are available without battery charging problems and built in GFCI protection, they can cost thousands of dollars more than the XP10000E DuroMax generator. Overall, the XP10000E it is a good generator for the money – even with the flaws revealed in the review I read. Especially during a long power outage, 10,000 watts is more than enough power to keep major appliances running to minimize food loss and enough spare power for other devices.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *